Family Walk & Roll Integrated Curriculum: MATH

I Read Signs (1987) by Tana Hoban (Gr. K-1)While reviewing what each signal means, talk about what geometric shape they represent (rectangle, square, triangle, hexagon, or diamond) Possible questions include:

  • Have you seen this sign?
    • Where?
    • What does it mean?
    • What shape is it?
  • Why are the colors important?

Create a Pictograph (Gr. K-1)Children can observe a parking lot through a window or a safe sidewalk/grassy area nearby. The instructor and children can discuss the types of transportation observed (cars, trucks, vans, buses, bicycles, motorcycles, convertibles, etc.). The instructor and children can count the number of different types of vehicles in the parking lot and at the bike rack (if there is one). Have children represent this data in the form of a pictograph to demonstrate the vehicles present. Have them include a key. Include a set of questions for the children to answer, using the following as starting points:

  • Which category has the fewest number of vehicles?
  • How many more cars are there than trucks?
  • How many vehicles are there total?

Mapping and Neighborhood Routes (Gr. 2-3)Explore your Family Walk & Roll Neighborhood Routes at www.sbbike.org/neighborhood_routes and learn to use an online mapping program. You can use sites like Google Maps, Strava or Ride with GPS to track miles to school, practices, study groups etc.

Comparing Sizes (Gr. 2-3)Children can analyze the size of a school bus and make comparisons to commonly known items, such as bikes, cars, and elephants. Have children estimate the heights of the following, then go over the answers:

  • The average car is about 5 feet tall.
  • An adult bicycle is approximately 3 feet 4 inches tall, depending on the user and type of bicycle.
  • The average school bus is 10 feet tall.
  • The average elephant is 9 to 11 feet tall.
  • An outdoor trash can is approximately 3 feet 6 inches tall.

Using a flip chart, children can list items from largest to smallest. Have children measure themselves and place their height in the list. Purposefully, most or all of these items should be taller. Children can make a bar graph of the items in the correct order by size. Have children answer questions similar to the following:

  • Are you taller or shorter than a trash can? By how much?
  • Are you taller or shorter than an elephant? By how much?
  • Are you taller or shorter than a car? By how much?

Ask children, should you cross the street from behind a parked car? Garbage can? Why? Use this lesson to reinforce why children should not cross the street from behind large objects or “visual barriers.”

Map Skills (Gr. 4-6)Using the Walk/Bike For a Week Project: Map your week, including your walk/ride to school and other activities. Include weekend trips.

  • How many miles would you travel?
  • How much unused fuel would you save?
  • How much exercise would you get?
  • How much extra time would it take?
  • What are the benefits? (list at least 5)
  • Is that extra time worth those benefits?

Street crossings (Gr. 4-6)To learn about the relationship between crossing distance, exposure time, and pedestrian safety, have children compare crossing streets using different distances. You will need a large room or playground area to show distance. Before you get started, ask children to estimate distance:- How far it is to cross a residential street (feet)?

Residential StreetHave children assist with measuring out 11 feet with tape or chalk and mark both ends. This is the approximate distance across one lane of traffic on a residential road. Have them measure out another 11 feet to show how far it would be to cross 2 lanes of traffic. Measure out as many as four lanes. Quick calculation: How many inches are in 11 feet?

Time children to calculate how long it takes to cross one lane of traffic on a residential road versus 2, 3, or 4 lanes. Have them write down the times in seconds on a number line diagram for each crossing. What is this difference in time between crossing two lanes vs. one lane? Three lanes versus one lane? Four lanes versus two lanes?

Collector StreetHave children measure out 14 feet with a tape or chalk and mark both ends. This is the approximate distance across one lane of traffic on a “sub-collector,” a road type which generally carries more traffic than a neighborhood street. Have them repeat the measurements for 14 feet to show how far it would be to cross 2, 3 and 4-lanes of traffic.

Time children to calculate how long it takes to cross one lane of traffic on a collector road versus 2, 3, or 4 lanes. Have them write down the times in seconds on a number line diagram for each crossing. What is this difference in time between crossing two lanes vs. one lane? Three lanes versus one lane? Four lanes versus two lanes?

Create a GraphHave children create a graph that shows the information they obtained in the exercise. Have them show seconds on one axis and number of lanes on the other axis. At the bottom of the graph have children write two or three sentences that explain the graph and what it means.

Ask childrenIf there is a choice, should they cross a 2-lane or 4-lane road? Why? Should they cross a neighborhood street or a collector street? Why?

Shorter pedestrian crossings reduce the amount of time a person is in the street. This reduces the amount of time they are at risk of being hit by a car (exposure time).

See Social Studies lessons for other Math extensions.

Other Resources

http://www.mathgametime.com/games/dirt-bike-proportions

http://www.hoodamath.com/games/dirtbikeproportions.html

http://www.pbs.org/teachers/mathline/concepts/designandmath/activity1.shtm

http://www.pbs.org/teachers/mathline/concepts/neighborhoodmath/activity3.shtm

https://ca.pbslearningmedia.org/subjects/mathematics/high-school-number--quantity

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